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M.G. 151/15 und M.G. 151/20 "Drilling" auf m. S.P.W. (Sd Kfz. 251/21)


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M.G. 151/15 und M.G. 151/20 "Drilling" auf m. S.P.W. (Sd Kfz. 251/21)

Triple Machine Gun on Semitracked Vehicle

 

*UPDATED 2-25-15* Added photos of real museum examples of the Drilling (EXCLUDING HALFTRACK) in Thumbnails section and RARE video footages of the sdkfz 251/21 Drilling in the new SECTION V. Photos come from the Wehrtechnikmuseum in Röthenbach, Wehrtechnische Studiensammlung in Koblenz, & Bundeswehr Military History Museum in Dresden. Also, a bit more description on the armaments specification is added to section IV.

 

*UPDATE #2 Same Date* Added a 3 more photos, a surprising example is a photo of a US soldier inspecting a blown up Drilling, surprisingly, the gun turret is largely intact. A second one shows a one lacking a hull. The third one is a model, note the 3 extra with ammunition boxes

 

*Update #3 2-25-15* Added a new rare photo of a knocked out Drilling with a dead crewman inside in the thumbnail section

*Update #4 3-11-15* New sets of miniature models. Great detail all in thumbnail section

*Update #5 3-19-15*- Added full set and suggested parameters for the guns ammunition and reloading along with a picture and diagram on the drilling. SEE section IV

 

 

note: "drilling" means "triplet" in German as flak"vierling"  means "quadruplet"

Table Of Contents:

 

I. Background Information & Specifications (Important Parts Highlighted in pink) ;).png 

II. Authentic Photos (Abundant Photos of it in the front lines indicate it had prominent use and operation) (also, some of the earliest photos of the vehicles were taken during Market Garden, there may be some in there) Due to photo limitations, i can only post a handful

III. Model Photos

IV. Armament Information & Diagram

V. Authentic Video Footages (RARE)

 

I.

SOURCE: Catalog of Enemy Ordnance, Originally Published by U.S. Office of Chief of Ordnance, 1945 German: p. 46.2 (April 1, 1945)

 

Screen_Shot_2015_02_23_at_10_42_26_PM.pn

 

This is the 8-ton, armored semitrack mounting triple 15 mm or 20 mm heavy machine guns of the Model 151 aircraft type. The equipment is an assault weapon intended for ground combat, and engagement of low flying aircraft is a secondary role.

The three guns, which are cocked manually and percussion fired, are set coaxially and in the same plane. Each gun is held in a standard MG 151 aircraft cradle, less the body extension. The cradles are bolted to a common block on the top bracket of the pedestal, pivoting on trunnions for elevation and depression. The top bracket is bolted to a bottom conical skirt and the whole rotates freely on a cone pedestal fixed to the floor of the vehicle. Elevation (-5° to 49°) and traverse (360°) are shoulder controlled by the firer. A brake locking device is provided for traverse.

The guns, capable of firing 700 r.p.m. each, are belt fed, the belts being contained in steel boxes, one for each gun. A total of 3,000 rounds of ammunition in belts is carried in the vehicle. Penetration of A.P. projectiles fired from the 15 mm MG 151 is reported as 18 mm from 100 meters at 30 degrees.

Sighting apparatus consists of a telescopic sight with a magnification of 3 and a field of view of 8 degrees; a cartwheel type antiaircraft sight, and a hand periscope with a magnification of 8 and a field of view of 7.5 degrees.

A further description of the components of this equipment is available on pages 45 and 252.

 

 

II.

ssarmora25117lateanda25.jpg

Great picture showing the flat terrain in Pomerania and a rare in action image of a Sd.Kfz 251/21 (center) and Sd.Kfz 251/22 (right). 

sd.kfz.251-21-c-1.jpg

Top view of an operational "Drilling" (note Correction:Notice that the outward cannons are equipped with "Schräg Düse" or "Oblique Nozzle" Muzzle Brakes and the center cannon is equipped with a shorter and uncut version and also positioned more forward than the outward ones)

sdkfz-251-21-drilling-halftrack.jpg

Abandoned "Drilling" with camouflage (note the open hatches)

 

 

sdkfz211.jpg

operational "Drilling" with foliage camouflage

9259997551_8553d18d22_b.jpg

"Drilling" knocked out of action in Berlin (note German civilians, probably postwar)

6877461131_b53aed5d9f_b.jpg

Group of Russian soldiers riding on a captured "Drilling" (If you look carefully at their caps, you can see the red star on them, they are carrying standard issue PPSH41 submachine guns, also note the one on the far right wearing Soviet medals)

 

5872803106_c4973cb2d9.jpg

Another one with female comrade

6830545413_cdf9af8aef_b.jpg  

 

An entire column of "Drillings" (looks abandoned, those troops look like Soviets)

 

 

III.

DSCF3558.jpg

 

http://www.missing-lynx.com/gallery/german/sdkfz25121df_1.html (this is the link for more)

 

 

IV.

 

According to the Bundeswehr Military History Museum in Dresden, Each cannon fires ~700 rounds per minute. However, the total combined rate of fire is ~2000 rounds per minute, according to information provided by the museum.

 

 

look closely and you will find that the cannons are belt fed

drilling01.jpg

 

Updated 3-19-15 below

 

(check thumbnails for the 2 new photos "drilling.gif" and "L35017f4.jpg"

 

The guns do not fire synchronously, each fires independently. Each cannon fires ~700 rpm, but due to the asynchronous firing , the combined rpm is ~2,000. The center cannon is fed by a larger munitions box that contains 500 rounds while the outer cannons each are fed by a box containing 250 rounds each. The reason for this is because the center gun placement makes reloading the center cannon more difficult, so this is compensated by increasing box capacity of the center box. The differences in the munitions box sizes is hard to tell but in the new photo and diagram you can clearly see (after exhausting research I did to find out exactly the capacity of each box). The Drilling will carry additional 4x250 round boxes and 2x500 round boxed adding to the total of 3,000 rounds. 

 

Keynote:

Adding this unique turret with cannons that contains different ammo capacities and firing intervals means that the cannons should have independent reload times. The mechanism should be same as how the M3 Lee in War Thunder functions. For example since the center turret contain 500 rounds and outer ones 250 rounds, then the cannons will reload immediately after its own ammo ran out instead of waiting for all the other guns to run out of bullets so they can reload at the same time.

 

V. Super Rare Footage

[youtube ]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiMgTwVpKc8[/youtube ]

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It seems odd that the external guns are the only ones with the cuts on the barrel.  You'd think, that if it was indeed a muzzle brake system, then all of the guns would have a similar cut.  Personally, I can't help but wonder if that isn't some kind of dispersal aid. The difference in pressure caused by that slanting would tend to make the rounds want to wander some, meaning move out of line with the direction the gun was pointed.  In dealing with Aircraft, this would be beneficial, since you would be putting more rounds in an area than instead of a set flat plane.  Not unlike a shotgun spread.

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it looks like the guns can be pointed down to protect against ground opponents, thats good. these photos and this vehicle look great

 

Pretty limited depression, due to the vehicle sides and front.  However it wouldn't stop them from firing on a distant vehicle.

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It seems odd that the external guns are the only ones with the cuts on the barrel.  You'd think, that if it was indeed a muzzle brake system, then all of the guns would have a similar cut.  Personally, I can't help but wonder if that isn't some kind of dispersal aid. The difference in pressure caused by that slanting would tend to make the rounds want to wander some, meaning move out of line with the direction the gun was pointed.  In dealing with Aircraft, this would be beneficial, since you would be putting more rounds in an area than instead of a set flat plane.  Not unlike a shotgun spread.

I believe it has to do with convergence.  Since its primary role serves as an ground assault weapon, its not a good idea to have spread when firing at long distances, you want your shots to stay focused. Also, notice the direction of the slanted brakes.

 

sdkfz251-21.jpg

Take the AK47 with a slant brake, the gun has tremendous amounts of upward recoil, the muzzle brake with the slant part pointed upwards negate upward recoil. So similar to the Drilling cannons, the muzzle break will negate the recoil to the direction the slant is facing to. And since the slant muzzle brakes are in the horizontal plane, therefore horizontal recoil is negated

AKAGUN20-D.jpg

heres a demonstration with an AK47. Start video at 0:47 seconds

 

https://www.youtube(dot)com/watch?v=ZbGixCAb0B8

 

(copy replace (dot) with a period)

Edited by RefrigerRaider
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It seems odd that the external guns are the only ones with the cuts on the barrel.  You'd think, that if it was indeed a muzzle brake system, then all of the guns would have a similar cut.  Personally, I can't help but wonder if that isn't some kind of dispersal aid. The difference in pressure caused by that slanting would tend to make the rounds want to wander some, meaning move out of line with the direction the gun was pointed.  In dealing with Aircraft, this would be beneficial, since you would be putting more rounds in an area than instead of a set flat plane.  Not unlike a shotgun spread.

The barrels are not cut. Look closely at the picture from above. The two outboard ones are slightly further back than the middle one.

 

Edit, nevermind. I see the diagonal cuts now.

Edited by Brogan1
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The barrels are not cut. Look closely at the picture from above. The two outboard ones are slightly further back than the middle one.

Ive made a mistake, indeed it is, and the muzzle brakes are actually ATTACHED to the actual barrels, I did further research on it. I will make corrections ASAP. the barrels and brakes blend right in together due to lack of color.

 

They are called Schräg Düse or "Oblique Nozzle"

Edited by RefrigerRaider
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Looks great! Would be awesome between the Gepard and the Wirbelwind or right after the Wirbelwind :) I want it!

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It seems odd that the external guns are the only ones with the cuts on the barrel.  You'd think, that if it was indeed a muzzle brake system, then all of the guns would have a similar cut.  Personally, I can't help but wonder if that isn't some kind of dispersal aid. The difference in pressure caused by that slanting would tend to make the rounds want to wander some, meaning move out of line with the direction the gun was pointed.  In dealing with Aircraft, this would be beneficial, since you would be putting more rounds in an area than instead of a set flat plane.  Not unlike a shotgun spread.

Look at the Kugelblitz's muzzle brake, which is slanted 45 degrees left... Maybe it explains a bit. 

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For more information about:

"Fliegerabwehr-Maschienengewehr Modell 151/20 auf Fliegerabwehr-Lafette 151D/B"

 

take a look @Enzyklopädie der Infanteriewaffen 1918 bis 1945.

Reiner Lindschun, Günter Wollert

Bechtermünz Verlag (mine from Weltbildverlag)

ISBN: 3-8289-0406-8

 

Page 210-214

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Hmm... it looks like it would be an interesting addition to the game, although... I think it should be in it's own separate branch of vehicles, all based on that series of Half-track... the Germans used it for just about everything, so... why not let us have a sub-tree of just that chassis, with all the variations it was produced in.

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Hmm... it looks like it would be an interesting addition to the game, although... I think it should be in it's own separate branch of vehicles, all based on that series of Half-track... the Germans used it for just about everything, so... why not let us have a sub-tree of just that chassis, with all the variations it was produced in.

if we get a line of half tracks i want this :D

Sdkfz_9_with_88_mm_flak.jpg

 

would be the troll of T2 since it was in service in 1939/1940 AFAIK

 

but anyway +1 to this Flak track :D

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Looking at the new images, it doesn't seem that the angle cut guns were standard.

correction, the guns were not cut, the angled ends are actually attachable muzzle brakes called Schräge Düsen. You are correct that not all have those. When they are equipped its generally the outer ones with the oblique muzzle brakes. The center one is equipped with a shorter and not cut version. Since the center cannon is positioned more forward and thus appear longer than the other 2, the shorter and uncut muzzle brake seem to make the center cannon look equal in length of the outward ones with longer muzzle brakes

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