Jump to content

Grumman F11F-1 Tiger


F11F-1 Tiger  

88 members have voted

  1. 1. Should the F11F-1 Tiger be added to Tier 6 of the USN line?

    • Yes.
      84
    • No.
      4


Aircraft: Grumman F11F-1 Tiger

 

Classification: Single-engine, carrier-based jet day-fighter

 

Visuals: 

 

Spoiler

 

unknown.png

 

unknown.png

 

unknown.png

unknown.png

 

unknown.png

 

unknown.png

 

unknown.png

 

unknown.png

unknown.png

unknown.png

 

unknown.png

 

unknown.png

 

unknown.png

 

 

Description: Born out of Gumman’s desire to adapt the F9F Cougar for supersonic performance, the F11F Tiger was the company’s attempt at designing an aircraft that adhered to the Area Rule. Initially referred to as the ‘F9F-9 Tiger’, the F11F was intended to present a large performance jump from the F9F-8 Cougar via its area-ruled fuselage to create a 25% reduction in transonic drag, Wright J65 engine which had most of its teething issues sorted out during FJ Fury and F-84F Thunderstreak production, as well as exceptionally thin wings milled from aluminum planks rather than traditional metal construction. 

 

Ultimately, the J65 engine which had seen widespread usage in both the USAF and USN arsenals would be modified to accommodate afterburning capability, eventually achieving 3000 lbf more thrust with it enabled compared to previous non-afterburning applications. This coupled with the all-new fuselage and wing design allowed the Tiger to go supersonic in level flight - the second USN aircraft to do so after the Douglas F4D-1 Skyray.

 

After completing its ground tests on July 24th, 1954, the F11F-1 Tiger was given the go ahead to fly on July 30th where it was found that the aircraft easily went supersonic in slight dives, thus beginning the process of addressing several prototypical issues such as excess buffet at high speeds which was solved by increasing the size of the airbrake’s hinge gaps. Another major issue was engine “backfiring” which accompanied loud duct rumble. This issue was ironed out by creating contoured knife-edge splitter plates in the engine air intake duct. 

 

There were two main production subtypes of F11F-1 Tigers, fittingly known as short-nose and long-nose variants. The 3 prototypes and subsequent initial production batch of 39 aircraft were all short-nose types with an in-flight refueling receptacle fixed at the tip of the nose. Deliveries of these early production F11Fs began in March 1957 to VA-156, but they also saw service with NATC, VC-3, and the Blue Angels. However, short-nose F11Fs were soon replaced by late-production long-nose Tigers which had a radome fitted in place of the refueling receptacle in order to accommodate a radar. Despite this intent, however, these F11Fs (and no F11F for that matter) would ever be fitted with one. Long-nose F11F-1s also differed from the early production batch by a wing fillet located at the leading edge of the wing root.

 

Unfortunately, seeing as that the much more advanced Vought F-8 Crusader entered Navy service at around the same time as the F11F-1, the Tiger was destined to have a short service life by account of its significantly lesser performance and range.

 

Fuel and Oil Data:

Internal Fuel Capacity: 1023 gallons (781 gals in fuselage tanks, 192 gals in wing tanks, 50 gals in tail tank)

Oil Capacity: 4.36 gallons 

 

Engine Data:

Manufacturer: Wright Aero

Designation: J65-W-18

Compressor Type: 13-stage axial-flow

Combustor Type: Annular 

Turbine Type: 2-stage axial-flow

Fuel Grade: JP-4

 

Power Data:

Afterburner Power: 10500 lbf @ 8300  RPM

Military & Takeoff Power: 7450 lbf @ 8300 RPM

Normal Power: 6470 lbf @ 8030 RPM 

 

Dimensional Data: 

Length (for short-nosed type): 44 ft, 10.75 in 

Length (for long-nosed type): 46 ft, 2.5 in 

Height:13 ft, 2.75 in

Wing Span: 31 ft, 8 in

Wing Area: 250 sq. ft 

Wing Loading: 73.5 lbs/sq. ft @ combat weight w/ clean configuration

 

Weight Data:

Empty Weight: 13307 lbs

Combat Weight (clean configuration, 60% fuel): 18375 lbs

Combat Weight w/ 4x Sidewinders (60% fuel): 19255 lbs

Normal Takeoff Weight (clean configuration, full internal fuel): 21035 lbs

Normal Takeoff Weight (4x Sidewinders, full internal fuel): 21915 lbs
Maximum Field Takeoff Weight: 23459 lbs

Fuel Weight: 6650 lbs (full internal tank)

 

General Performance Data (normal takeoff weight, clean configuration):

Max Speed: 588 knots (1089 kph) @ 18000 ft w/ military thrust

Rate of Climb @ SL:  5130 ft/min (26.06 m/s) w/ military thrust

Power-off, flaps-up Stall Speed: 124.5 knots (230.57 kph)

Takeoff Distance: 4260 ft w/ takeoff thrust

Service Ceiling: 41900 ft w/ military thrust

 

General Performance Data (normal takeoff weight, 4x Sidewinders):

Max Speed: 551 knots (1020.45 kph) @ 25000 ft w/ military thrust

Rate of Climb @ SL: 4050 ft/min (20.57 m/s) w/ military thrust

Power-off, flaps-up Stall Speed: 127.1 knots (235.39 kph)

Takeoff Distance: 4700 ft w/ takeoff thrust

Service Ceiling: 37700 ft w/ military thrust

 

NOTE: exact speed:altitude figures have limited accuracy (+/- 5 knots) due to SAC graph resolution in some instances.

Maximum Speeds (combat weight of 18375 lbs, clean configuration, afterburner):

At SL: 654 knots (1211.21 kph)

At 10000 ft: ~638 knots (1181.58 kph)

At 20000 ft: ~635 knots (1176.02 kph)

At 30000 ft: ~642 knots (1188.98 kph)

At 35000 ft: 632 knots (1170.46 kph)

At 40000 ft: ~611 knots (1131.57 kph)

At 50000 ft: ~543 knots (1005.64 kph)

 

NOTE: exact speed:altitude figures have limited accuracy (+/- 5 knots) due to SAC graph resolution in some instances.

Maximum Speeds (combat weight of 19255 lbs, 4x Sidewinders, afterburner):

At SL: 630 knots (1166.76 kph)

At 35000 ft: 585 knots (1083.42 kph)

 

NOTE: exact climb:altitude figures have limited accuracy due to SAC graph resolution.

Maximum Rate of Climb (combat weight of 18375 lbs, clean configuration, afterburner):

At SL: 16300 ft/min (82.8 m/s)

At 10000 ft: ~15000 ft/min (76.2 m/s)

At 20000 ft: ~12800 ft/min (65.02 m/s)

At 30000 ft: ~10000 ft/min (50.8 m/s)

At 40000 ft: ~5100 ft/min (25.91 m/s)

At 50000 ft: ~450 ft/min (2.29 m/s)

 

NOTE: exact climb:altitude figures have limited accuracy due to SAC graph resolution.

Maximum Rate of Climb (combat weight of 19255 lbs, 4x Sidewinders, afterburner):

At SL: 10800 ft/min (54.86 m/s)

At 35000 ft: 6000 ft/min (30.48 m/s)

 

Time to Climb (takeoff weight of 21035 lbs, clean configuration, military thrust):

From SL to 20K ft: 4.7 min

From SL to 30K ft: 8.1 min

 

Time to Climb (takeoff weight of 21915 lbs, 4x Sidewinders, military thrust): 

From SL to 20K ft: 6.0 min

From SL to 30K ft: 11.0 min

 

Armament: 

Guns: 4x Colt Mk.12 Mod 0 20mm cannon (500 rounds total)

Missiles: Up to 4x Sidewinders 

Bombs: Mk. 82 1000 lb bombs

Rockets: GAU-7 2.75” rocket pods (Aero 6A or 7A)

 

Sources:

[1] Standard Aircraft Characteristics F11F-1 “Tiger” Grumman, NAVAER 1355A (Rev.1-55), 30 June 1957

[2] Standard Aircraft Characteristics F-11A “Tiger” Grumman, NAVAER 1355A (Rev.1-55), 30 June 1957

[3] F11F Tiger in detail & scale by Bert Kinzey, D&S Vol.17, Aero Publishers, Inc., 1984, ISBN 0-8168-5026-7

[4] Naval Fighters Number Forty: Grumman F11F Tiger by Corwin Meyer, 1997, ISBN: 0-942612-40-X

Edited by Aquilachrysaetos
  • Like 1
  • Upvote 9
medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Senior Suggestion Moderator

Open for discussion. :salute:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
21 hours ago, MonkeyBussiness said:

+1 , isn't it the only aircraft in history to shoot himself down with his guns ?

 

Not sure if the "only" aircraft to do so, but yes, it did shoot itself down: https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/aviation/a27967/the-fighter-plane-that-shot-itself-down/

medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
  • 6 months later...

Great addition, though I fear it should have been here almost a year ago at this point. To go through this to other USN fighters will be extremely painful now with how top tier jets are...

 

That said I hope to see soon this

F-11A > F-8 Crusader 

medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, CK_16 said:

Great addition, though I fear it should have been here almost a year ago at this point. To go through this to other USN fighters will be extremely painful now with how top tier jets are...

 

That said I hope to see soon this

F-11A > F-8 Crusader 

Yeah she'll be fairly outclassed by now but I definitely still want to see earlier jets even if they aren't going to be top dogs of the tree

medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
  • 3 months later...

I actually learned that only about 200 were made, so it's not as iconic as I originally thought. It seems fair in retrospect. Before I looked up number produced, I thought it'd be like, 500 at least.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

29 minutes ago, Fa11enPhoenix said:

Might still end up in the regular tree eventually, happened with the FJ-4B a couple of years back.

Conveniently I'm on leave in the middle of August so might actually have a shot at this one.

 

In June 2018, the FJ-4B showed up in the regular tree first, then the event FJ-4B VMF-232 came a couple months later for that year's last-minute Operation Summer as a copy-paste with one exception: it had Bullpups while the tech tree version didn't.

 

The situation with the F11F-1 is a bit different, as this isn't an aircraft from any particular squadron or pilot, and there's no other variants of the F11F to put in the main tree. The F11F-1F exists, but that has scant performance data and is merely a footnote in the history of USN aviation.

  • Upvote 1
medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The final naval jet combat aircraft Grumman made before transitioning to the legendary F-14 Tomcat, is an event vehicle...

Pffft. 

 

Any clue as what BR and its 'special' camouflage will be?

They didn't show it with the other event vehicles.

Edited by PIeb
  • Upvote 1
medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, PIeb said:

The final naval jet combat aircraft Grumman made before transitioning to the legendary F-14 Tomcat, is an event vehicle...

Pffft. 

 

Any clue as what BR and its 'special' camouflage will be?

They didn't show it with the other event vehicles.

 

Comparable performance to a F-100 (slightly worse overall), so probably 9.7 in the current jet BR paradigm. Maybe 10.0, but it only had access to AIM-9Bs so I doubt it.

 

No idea what the special camo is, but it'll assuredly be low-res, inaccurate, and low-quality like all other Gajin-produced skins...the skinners on live should probably remedy that though.

  • Upvote 2
medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Aquilachrysaetos said:

 

In June 2018, the FJ-4B showed up in the regular tree first, then the event FJ-4B VMF-232 came a couple months later for that year's last-minute Operation Summer as a copy-paste with one exception: it had Bullpups while the tech tree version didn't.

 

The situation with the F11F-1 is a bit different, as this isn't an aircraft from any particular squadron or pilot, and there's no other variants of the F11F to put in the main tree. The F11F-1F exists, but that has scant performance data and is merely a footnote in the history of USN aviation.

 

Fair enough, thought the FJ-4B went the other way about, Event then Tree.

 

Though the skin shown above is for a specific squadron, VF-33, went by the name "Astronauts" at the time they flew the Tiger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

38 minutes ago, Fa11enPhoenix said:

 

Fair enough, thought the FJ-4B went the other way about, Event then Tree.

 

Though the skin shown above is for a specific squadron, VF-33, went by the name "Astronauts" at the time they flew the Tiger.

 

Sure, but many skins on many vehicles often represent a particular squadron's scheme rather than a generic camouflage (although generic unpainted machines are quite common as well). 

 

Case in point: the F9F-8 wears the camouflage seen on VF-112 Broncos, the Javelin FAW Mk.9 wears (an albeit odd version of) No.11 Squadron's colors, etc.

  • Upvote 1
medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is good that version F-1F is event plane because was built only two protypes. Standard F-11 will be probably in normal tech tree in future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, csla1972 said:

Is good that version F-1F is event plane because was built only two protypes. Standard F-11 will be probably in normal tech tree in future.

It's the F11F-1 200 were built, we aren't getting the Super Tiger although that should have been the event plane

  • Upvote 2
medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Technical Moderator

Do you get bonus points for shooting yourself down? :p:  (true incident)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 10. 8. 2020 at 20:27, gaelan@psn said:

Je to F11F-1 200, ktoré boli postavené, nedostávame Super Tiger, hoci to malo byť lietadlo udalostí

Oh yes sorry. I made mistake. I also think the F version should have an event plane and a standard version in a normal tech tree. Maybe in future, when they add F-11 to tech tree, we get F version.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...