Jump to content

McDonnell Douglas F-4C Phantom II - Reading The Next Page


READ STATS BEFORE VOTING  

36 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you want to see this plane in War Thunder?

    • Yes
      35
    • No (explain why)
      0
    • Maybe/Undecided/I don't know yet
      1
  2. 2. Where would it be placed if added?

    • After the F-100D
      27
    • After the F9F-8
      1
    • After the B-57B
      0
    • After the FJ-4B
      2
    • Other
      1
    • Undecided/I don't know yet
      5
    • I don't want it
      0
  3. 3. Which BR should it be at?

    • 9.0
      1
    • 9.3
      2
    • 9.7
      2
    • 10.0
      9
    • 10.3
      1
    • 10.7
      2
    • 11.0
      8
    • 11.3
      2
    • 11.7
      0
    • 12.0
      4
    • Other (explain in comments)
      1
    • Undecided/I don't know yet
      4
    • I don't want it
      0


The F-4C Phantom II is the first Phantom to enter service with the USAF, and the F-4B being the USN F-4. 

 

I dug in for more research. Previously I used to say it's the exact same as the F-4B, but for the USAF. Turns out I'm wrong; this differs from the F-4B by being without the hook for carrier landings and the first Phantom to have a gunpod option as an official loadout preset. It also had more armament options if I'm not wrong; AIM-4 Falcons and several more versions of the AIM-7 (like the AIM-7E-2, AIM-7F and AIM-7M).

 

Lastly, some performance changes. This was heavier than the F-4B; decreasing its speed capabilities. This may sound bad, however it would be much better for the game; since that would mean a more fair F-4 vs MiG-21 match up. 

 

Quick overview:

 

two_f110a.jpg

(F-110A Spectre, as initially designated, in the 120 day trials)

Spoiler

 

The McDonnell Douglas F-4C Phantom II is the first F-4 Phantom to serve the United States Air Force and the first Phantom to officially have gunpods as a weapon preset; due to pilot complaints about the lack of an internal gun. It was capable of Mach 2 at high altitude and supersonic speeds at sea level; 2,306 km/h (1,433 mph) at 14,630 m (51,600 ft) and 1,329 km/h (825.8 mph) at sea level.

 

The F-4C served from 1965 to 1972 in the Vietnam War and was eventually replaced by the F-4D.

 

f-110a_aim9.jpg

 

 

 

History, design and development:

 

f-4c_12tfw_camranh.jpg


 

Spoiler

 

Soon, after adopting the US Navy carrier aviation, the F4H-1 fighter was elected to the US presidency, John F. Kennedy. The young president appointed Robert McNamara to the post of minister of defense. The new minister set himself the goal of total reform and standardization of the US armed forces. Guided by the idea of standardization, McNamara proposed the creation of a multifunctional combat aircraft that would be for the Air Force and Navy, capable of accomplishing the tasks of drawing on ground targets, as well as fighting the enemy in the air. This concept later evolved into the TFX program, which resulted in the creation of the F-111. But at that time, the F4H was the best fighter available to the United States, and McNamara suggested the Air Force evaluate the Phantom.

 

At that time, the US Air Force was armed with the successful F-105 fighter-bomber, capable of carrying both conventional and nuclear weapons, flying at supersonic speeds. And despite the fact that the Phantom bomb load was less than that of the F-105, the Phantom carried the latest AIM-7 Sparrow SD, which was very much in line with the concept of McNamara’s versatility.

In 1961, tests were conducted, called the Operation Highspeed, during which the Phantom competed with the F-106 interceptor. During these tests, the capabilities of the F4H as an interceptor fighter were considered. As a result, the Phantom showed overwhelming superiority over the "sixes". In addition, the F4H was much simpler and 30% cheaper to operate.

 

In January 1962, Kennedy requested approval from the US Congress for the purchase for the Air Force of the F4H-1 variant, called Specter. After that, the Air Force borrowed two Phantoms from the Navy, in order to conduct one hundred and twenty-day flight and operational tests at Langley Air Base. Both Phantoms retained the color of the Navy, but the emblems of the tactical command of aviation were affixed to the keels. On the nose part in large letters was marked the designation assigned to Phantom in the Air Force - F-110A. During the tests, the designations of the Air Force and Navy vehicles were replaced by a single one, and the Phantoms in service with the Navy and the Marine Corps received the designations F-4A and F-4B, and the F-110A was changed to F-4C.

 

After the tests were completed, the Air Force released the SOR 200 specification (Specific Operation Requirement 200), which included Air Force requirements for serial Phantoms. The most important requirement was the need to ensure the possibility of using a wide range of means from conventional free-fall bombs to tactical nuclear and guided missiles. In the composition of the air combat means to the existing UR AIM-7 Sparrow, it was required to include UR AIM-4 Falcon with ICGOS. It was also possible to use the latest UR AGM-12 Bullpup. For the suspension of the whole range of weapons were installed new suspension systems.

It was also required to install dual aircraft controls in the radar operator's cabin. To improve visibility, the front dashboard in the operator’s cab is installed below. The main landing gear was prescribed to “get” into wider low-pressure wheels with more powerful brakes, and equipped with an anti-skid system, which led to the emergence of “bumps” on the upper and lower wing in the vicinity of the wells of the main chassis supports.

 

Outside, the F-4C were almost identical to the Navy F-4B. The landing hook and wing folding system were even saved. But the internal difference was very significant. Phantoms destined for the Air Force received new J79-GE-15 engines, which differed from those used on the naval aircraft J79-GE-8 by the ability to run autonomously at the expense of a pyrostarter. The boom of the in-flight refueling system was removed and replaced with a system compatible with the SAC tankers, which was installed in the gargrot. The AN / APQ-72 radar was replaced with a newer radar with the AN / APQ-100 terrain mapping mode from Westinghouse. To highlight the target missiles AIM-7 station used AN / APA-157. In the place with the new inertial aiming-navigation system AN / ASN-48 of the Litton company, an aiming system AN / AJB-7 was installed, allowed to use tactical nuclear weapons and guided missiles. From the radionavigation equipment, the radio altimeter AN / APN-141 (later -159), the A24G navigation computer, the AN / ASN-39 calculator (later -46), the radiation warning system receiver AN / ALR-17, the analogue autopilot AN / ASA-32A, state recognition system AN / ASQ-19, as well as the Bullpup AN / ARW-77 missile guidance system. Some aircraft were equipped with a SST-181X Combat Spot radar bomber. 

 

For the emergency rescue of the crew, ejection Mk H5 seats by Martin Baker were installed. receiver of the radiation warning system AN / ALR-17, analogue autopilot AN / ASA-32A, state recognition system AN / ASQ-19, as well as the missile guidance system Bullpup AN / ARW-77. Some aircraft were equipped with a SST-181X Combat Spot radar bomber. For the emergency rescue of the crew, ejection Mk H5 seats by Martin Baker were installed. receiver of the radiation warning system AN / ALR-17, analogue autopilot AN / ASA-32A, state recognition system AN / ASQ-19, as well as the missile guidance system Bullpup AN / ARW-77. Some aircraft were equipped with a SST-181X Combat Spot radar bomber. For the emergency rescue of the crew, ejection Mk H5 seats by Martin Baker were installed.

Armament for air combat included 4 medium-range missiles with semi-active AHG-7D or 7E RSGS deployed on semi-fused fuselage suspension nodes and 4 AIM-4D or AIM-9B or 9D short-range SDs with IKGSN on external wing pylons. In addition to the NURS units and various bombs in the F-4C arsenal, there were new SD AGM-12 Bullpup with radio command guidance system, SPM AGM-45 Shrike, SD AGMM-45 Maverick with TVGSN, as well as the Mk.28 bomb for special warhead. The combat load of the Phantom F-4C was 7260 kg.

 

While the US Air Force was expecting deliveries of the first serial F-4Cs, another 27 F-4Bs were transferred from the Navy. Most of the aircraft were distributed to the 4453 wing of the crew’s combat training, based at McDill Air Force Base in Florida, where crew and ground personnel were trained. In March 1962, the United States Air Force signed a contract for serial production of F-4C with McDonnell. After familiarization with the full-size F-4C mock-up in April 1962, the serial production of Phantoms for the Air Force was launched.

In 1963, on May 27, five years later, after the first flight of the Phantom, the first serial F-4C broke away from the concrete of the airfield. In the first flight, the speed exceeded Mach 2 and the aircraft was immediately adopted by the US Air Force. The use of the tried and tested in the Navy F-4B allowed the Air Force to get a new aircraft as quickly as possible.

As they left the assembly line, the new F-4Cs replaced the F-4B out of 4,453 wings. In January 1964, the F-4C began to arrive in the 12th tactical wing, based at McDill Air Base. The 12th air wing reached full combat readiness by October of the same year. Early next year, the F-4C US Air Force brought in combat missions in Southeast Asia.

In 1964, on December 2, a link of four F-4C set an unofficial record for flight duration for a jet fighter. During the flight, which lasted 18 hours, a distance of 16,000 kilometers was covered. During the flight, several refueling operations were carried out from the KC-135 tankers.

At the end of 1964, one F-4C squadron was deployed at the Vietnamese Cam Ranh airbase and was involved in combat operations in Vietnam. Almost immediately there was a problem of massive equipment failures due to heat and high humidity. Improvements were made that cost the US Air Force $ 41,667 per aircraft. Leaving the problems behind, in June 1965, F-4C of 555 squadrons entered the battle. The first air victory was won on July 10 of the same year, when a pair of F-4Cs from 45 squadrons were hit by two Vietnamese MiG-17s by Sidewinders, opening a combat account of this type of air victories. Beginning in 1965, the United States Air Force abandoned the standard gray color for the Navy, and a new tricolor camouflage was applied to the aircraft, more suitable for the conditions of the jungle. The standard version of the F-4C combat load in Vietnam was 4 AIM-7 missiles, 4 AIM-9 missiles and 8,340 kg bombs.

 

During the first two years of fighting over Vietnam, F-4C losses reached 40%. From 1965 to 1966, 44 aircraft were lost in the battles. The main losses were received due to anti-aircraft artillery fire, as well as due to piloting errors, which often led to a crash into a tailspin. During air combat, when maneuvering with large overloads or angles of attack, the F-4C often fell into a tailspin, from which it was impossible to get out at an altitude of less than 3000 meters, and the crew had to eject.

The combat experience of the Vietnam War showed that the initial abandonment of the armed forces of the Navy UR AIM-9 in favor of AIM-4 was erroneous. These missiles showed very low accuracy and reliability. Over time, the suspension cannons SUU-16 / A and SUU-23 / A with the 20-mm M61 cannon were introduced into the F-4C armament. Initially, the control panel was planned to be used for attacking ground targets, but in practice they were useful for air combat, as the Phantoms could not oppose anything with powerful MiG-17 guns in close combat. To solve this problem, they began to hang on the central ventral pylon SUU-16 / A.

From June 1966 to December 1967, the US Air Force lost 6 F-4C, causing cracks in the hydraulic cylinders of the aileron control units. The F-4C early release series had a problem with fuel tank leaks. The problem was so serious that after each flight it was necessary to seal the tanks. Also on the first aircraft often found cracks in the power elements of the wing structure. Later, stringers and frames effort, refined drill planes. Constantly refused radar. Electronics turned out to be too sensitive to high humidity in Vietnam.

 

In 1968, the 36 F-4C was converted into EF-4C Wild Weasel 4 EW aircraft. These aircraft were equipped with the AN / APR-25 radar warning system, the AN / APR-26 launch warning system, as well as ER-142 radiation source. Subsequently, AN / APR-26 was replaced by AN / APR-46, and AN / ALR-53 came to replace ER-142. The aircraft equipped the first generation AGM-45 Shrike CPD, which made it very limited the tactical capabilities of the EF-4C.

 

Since 1972, the US Air Force began to withdraw F-4C from the divisions. Ten F-4Cs were handed over to the 170th US National Guard tactical wing, located in Illinois. In 1976, the F-4C began to enter the 199 wing of the National Guard, based on the island of Hawaii. In total, the F-4C was armed with 14 wings of the National Guard, where they served until 1989. From 1978 to 1983, F-4C fighter jets armed 93 squadrons of the US Air Force reserve.

The latest F-4C was rolled out of the McDonnell assembly shop in St. Louis on May 4, 1966. In total, 583 aircraft were launched, 36 of which later, in 1971, were sold to the Spanish Air Force, where they became the C-12 designation of two squadrons of Torrihon airbase.

The F-4C was replaced by the following version of the Phantom - F-4D.

 

f-4c_wbullpups.jpg

 

 

 

Internal Components:

 

Spoiler

Image result for F-4C Phantom II cutaway

Spoiler

 

anapq-100.jpg

(AN/APQ-100 radar)

 

 

Cockpit:

 

Spoiler

 

f4c-cocpit.jpg rwo_cockpit.jpg

 

 

 

 

Specifications:

 

f-4c_firing_two_suu23.jpg

(The F-4C could carry up to three SUU-23 gunpods with M61 gattling cannons, here it's carrying two)

 

Spoiler

 

McDonnell Douglas F-4C Phantom II

 

f-4c_cx.jpg

 

First flight: 27th of May, 1963

Number built: 583

Role: Interceptor

Status: Production, canceled

Crew: 2

Length: 17.77 m (58.3 ft)

Wingspan: 11.71 m (38.41 ft)

Wing area: 49.24 m² (530 ft²)

Height: 4.95 m (16.24 ft)

Empty weight: 12,925 kg (28,496 lbs)

Basic weight: 12,820.788 (28,265 lbs)

Design weight: 23,319.637 kg (51,144 lbs)

Combat weight: 17,396.1746 kg (38,352 lbs)

Max. takeoff weight: 26,308 kg (58,000 lbs)

Max. landing weight: 15,422.141 kg (34,800 lbs)

Powerplant: 2 x General Electric J-79-GE-15 afterburning turbojet

  • without afterburner: 4,944.1568 kgf (48.48 kN, 10,900 lbf) (each), 9,888.3136 kgf (96.96 kN, 21,800 lbf) (total)
  • with afterburner: 7,717 kgf (75.61 kN, 17,031 lbf) (each), 14,342 kgf (151.22 kN, 34.602 lbf) (total)

Fuel capacity: 7,518 liters (1,986 US gal)

  • Optional: 1 x 2,271 liters (1 x 600 US gal) drop tank or 2 x 1,400 liters (2 x 370 liters) drop tanks

 

Performance

 

Maximum speed (full power): 

  • At sea level: 1,329 km/h (826 mph, 717.6 kts) 
  • At 14,630 m (48,000 ft): 2,306 km/h (1,433 mph, 1,245 kts)

Stall speed: 240 km/h (149 mph, 129.59 kts)

Rate of climb: 206 m/s (675.83 ft/s) (full power) 

Service ceiling: 17,100 m (56,100 ft)

Range: 865.8 km (538 mi, 467 nmi)

Max. range: 3,099.6 km (1,926 mi, 1,673.6 nmi)

Wing loading: 

  • Empty weight: 262.489846 kg/m² (53.76 lb/ft²)
  • Basic weight: 260.373436 kg/m² (53.33 lb/ft²)
  • Design weight: 473.591328 kg/m² (97 lb/ft²)
  • Combat weight: 353.293554 kg/m² (72.36 lb/ft²)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 534.281072 kg/m² (109.43 lb/ft²)
  • Max. landing weight: 313.203513 kg/m² (64.15 lb/ft²)

Thrust/weight (without afterburner):

  • Empty weight: 0.76
  • Basic weight: 0.77
  • Design weight: 0.42
  • Combat weight: 0.57
  • Max. takeoff weight: 0.37
  • Max. landing weight: 0.64

 

Thrust/weight (with afterburner):

  • Empty weight: 1.11
  • Basic weight: 1.12
  • Design weight: 0.61
  • Combat weight: 0.82
  • Max. takeoff weight: 0.54
  • Max. landing weight: 0.92

 

Armament

 

Guns: N/A

Missiles:

  • 4 x AIM-4D Falcon semi-active radar-homing air-to-air missiles

or

  • 4 x AIM-7D Sparrow semi-active radar-homing air-to-air missiles

or

  • 6 x AIM-7D Sparrow semi-active radar-homing air-to-air missiles

or

  • 4 x AIM-7E-2 Sparrow semi-active radar-homing air-to-air missiles

or

  • 4 x AIM-9B Sidewinder infrared-homing/heat-seeking air-to-air missiles

or

  • 4 x AIM-9E Sidewinder infrared-homing/heat-seeking air-to-air missiles

Bombs: 

  • 24 x 250 lbs (24 x 100 kg) Mk 81 bombs

or

  • 24 x 500 lbs (24 x 250 kg) Mk 82 bombs

or

  • 11 x 450 lbs (11 x 200 kg) Mk 83 bombs

Rockets:

  • 15 x 127mm (5.0 in) Zuni unguided rockets

or

  • 15 x 70mm (2.75 in) FFAR "Mighty Mouse" unguided rockets

Radar: AN/APQ-100

Optional:

  • 1 x 20mm M61A1 Vulcan gattling cannon (1,200 rds total) in SUU-16 gunpod 

or

  • 1 x 20mm M61A1 Vulcan gattling cannon (1,200 rds total) in SUU-23 gunpod

or

  • 2 x 20mm M61A1 Vulcan gattling cannon (1,200 rpg, 2,400 rds total) in SUU-23 gunpods

or

  • 3 x 20mm M61A1 Vulcan gattling cannon (1,200 rpg, 3,600 rds total) in SUU-23 gunpods

Image result for f-4c blueprint

 

 

 

Sources/References:

 

f-4c_555tfs_dec1964.jpg

 

Spoiler

 

http://www.joebaugher.com/usaf_fighters/f4_7.html

Kinzey, B., F-4C, F-4D & amp; RF-4C Phantom II. In Detail & Scale Vol. 43. ISBN 0-89024-204-6 
Greer, D., F - 4 Phantom II In Action. Squadron Signal Publications, Carrollton, USA, 1984. ISBN 0-89747-154-7 
Gunston, B., NATO combat aircraft. Svojtka and Vasut, 1995. ISBN 80-7180-105-4 

F-4C Phantom II Multipurpose Fighter - Denis Evstafev

F-4 Phantom II Bill Gunston

 

 

Edited by EpicBlitzkrieg87
  • Confused 1
  • Upvote 1
medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Senior Suggestion Moderator

Open for discussion. :salute:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, kamikazi21358 said:

+1, but I put over 12.0 because I hope the existing jets could get extended to 11.0 or 11.3 or so.

 

Also the duel 30mm Gatling gun gunpod sounds mildly destructive.

 

Imagine an actual 30mm gattling cannon :vanga:

  • Confused 1
medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

On 03/08/2019 at 15:46, EpicBlitzkrieg87 said:

 

 


 

Hmm interesting how will the F4C use Aim7M  utilizing a much older radar when  for the F4E the AIm7F was the best radar based missile to be integrated that platform?

Edited by RanchSauce39

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, RanchSauce39 said:

 


 

Hmm interesting how will the F4C use Aim7M  utilizing a much older radar when  for the F4E the AIm7F was the best radar based missile to be integrated that platform?

 

That's what I read about it. I couldn't find the SAC 

  • Confused 1
medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, EpicBlitzkrieg87 said:

 

That's what I read about it. I couldn't find the SAC 

 

 

No Aim7M's

 

 

From F4C/D/E Flight manual 1970.

 


KCsrgpO.png

 

 

 

F4C Dash 34 ( Non nuclear weapons delivery) . 1973 revision reference

 

 

 

8UljrQN.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

To compare even from a dedicated F4E manual  with late revision  from 1986  ( when F4C was already retired)

 

fUv6h2W.png

 

 

 

 

vCAUkiB.png

 

 

 

 

 

Aim9P   and AIm7F  are the most potent A2A missiles a USAF based F4E phantoms were ever able to use

 

SO a F4C or D is certainly not going to be using a Aim7M considering the were all retired before the F4E was, and that never got Aim7M.

 

 

 

 

Edited by RanchSauce39

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 07/08/2019 at 18:20, TyphoonCro said:

 

That is for Phantom FGR.2

You can even see AIM-9L and telesocopic front gear

 

Inclusion of the Aim9L alone wouldn't mean its  FGR2.  Aim9L and Aim9M are  authorized load out for the F4E. its just that its integration came very late in its life.

 

Excerpt From a USAF series F4E manual   published 1984( with a final 1990 revision)

 

XfJXWO0.png

 

 

Edited by RanchSauce39

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, RanchSauce39 said:

 

Inclusion of the Aim9L alone wouldn't mean its  FGR2.  Aim9L and Aim9M are  authorized load out for the F4E. its just that its integration came very late in its life.

 

Excerpt From a USAF series F4E manual   published 1984( with a final 1990 revision)

 

XfJXWO0.png

 

 

 

Yes although that is FGR.2 on that diagram

Spoiler

F-4_Phantom-1.gif

 

Because American Phantoms never had telescopic gear, RWR on top of rudder and RR Spey engines

medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
5 minutes ago, Milocat said:

I was iffy about this plane before, but we're getting it now.  

 

https://warthunder.com/en/news/6352-development-f-4c-phantom-ii-the-record-breaker-en 

 

Looks like we're getting aircraft to counter it next update too, which was the only thing I was worried about.  

And just like that it's an implemented suggestion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Milocat said:

I was iffy about this plane before, but we're getting it now.  

 

https://warthunder.com/en/news/6352-development-f-4c-phantom-ii-the-record-breaker-en 

 

Looks like we're getting aircraft to counter it next update too, which was the only thing I was worried about.  

 

Only for one tree though (the Soviets).  The Brits, Italians, Germans, and French are still left in the dust, though the Japanese shouldn't have too hard of a time with their T-2.

Edited by Z3r0_
medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, kamikazi21358 said:

Hopefully all nations will get actual counters to this eventually.

 

Also, in the future, earlier F4s without gun options at a lower BR to this would be nice.

 

F4C is the earliest USAF F4 variation.

 

F4B is the Navy's earliest, and they too have option for at least Mk4  (colt mk 12) gunpods, although some sources show USMC F4B's having vulcan gunpods like the USAF.

Edited by RanchSauce39

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, RanchSauce39 said:

 

F4C is the earliest USAF F4 variation.

 

F4B is the Navy's earliest, and they too have option for at least Mk4  (colt mk 12) gunpods, although some sources show USMC F4B's having vulcan gunpods like the USAF.

What about the F4A?  Isn’t it Navy too?

medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, kamikazi21358 said:

What about the F4A?  Isn’t it Navy too?

 

Isnt that basically a pre production model? why does the USN need that version after an F8 crusader(s) ? 

 

The F4B ( and later) is the one that actually matters.

Edited by RanchSauce39

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, RanchSauce39 said:

 

Isnt that basically a pre production model? why does the USN need that version after an F8 crusader(s) ? 

 

The F4B ( and later) is the one that actually matters.

It could lack gunpods, and be balanced lower without the gunpods (missiles only).

Essentially, the answer is ‘why not?’

medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • Senior Suggestion Moderator

As the F-4C Phantom II has been implented in update 1.91,

 

Moved to Implemented Suggestions.:salute:

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...